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Education tool / teaching aid


Microbes have an involvement in human and veterinary disease, are key in numerous food and drink production processes, have important environmental roles, as well as roles in manufacturing industries. The importance of microbiology is recognised in the UK National Curriculum, with the idea of microbes, both harmful and useful, introduced as early as Key Stage 2.


Microbiology is a part of science lessons through increasingly senior levels of the National Curriculum, found in both GCSE and A-Level curricula. The Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) lists 39 providers of pure microbiology undergraduate degrees, though many degrees will touch on the topic in association with clinical and manufacturing subjects.


With an engaging design and able to operate as a standalone device or connected to a computer to show microbial activity in real time, Speedy Breedy offers educators an easy-to-use device for demonstrating topics such as :

  • What samples bacteria can be found in.
  • Microbial metabolism and the factors affecting growth.
  • The impact of antibiotics on microbial growth.
  • The importance of Quality Assurance in food production.

Speedy Breedy also acts as an excellent tool for the broader topic of how to design and conduct experiments. Examples may include (depending on the age group of the students):

  • The importance of hygiene in infection control.
  • Water cleanliness in the environment.
  • Developing a good bacterial growth medium.
  • The importance of cooking temperature and bacterial growth in food production.

Providing everything the student (or students) may need in a portable, self-contained, robust and easy-to-use device, Speedy Breedy can allow the student to become fully immersed in planning, sampling for and completing an investigation of their own, a skill at the heart of all practical science.


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Lab Memo 1 Speedy Breedy Typical Detection Times